Sunday, November 12, 2017

Lost and Found Nov. 13, 2017

Problem of the Week (Nov. 13, 2017)
Lost and Found
Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Reminder: Check the Lower School lost and found before the Thanksgiving holiday. To help you remember, all the problems this week relate to lost things that were later found.

Level 1: Lost Lego: If one of your Lego bricks gets vacuumed up in June, and then pops out of the vacuum 3 months later, what month did it reappear?

Level 2: Long Lost Watch: A man named Ed lost his wristwatch 53 years ago when he was in the Navy. Someone returned it to him in 2012. What year did he lose it?

Level 3: A Long Way Down: Students at Stanford University sent up a weather balloon with a GoPro camera attached so they could take pictures of the Grand Canyon from miles above the ground. When the camera fell back to Earth, the students couldn’t find it. Two years later, some hikers in the Grand Canyon found it! If the camera went 5 miles up, and then came 5 miles down, how many feet did the camera travel? (Hint: One mile = 5,280 feet)

SUPER BONUS: If you lost your sneakers 10 months ago and found them 4 months later, and you lost your favorite shirt 2 years ago and found it halfway between losing and finding your sneakers, how long were you missing the shirt?  A drawing or bar model might be helpful.


Thank you to Bedtime Math for the problem idea.

Monday, November 6, 2017

Take a Flight of Fancy Nov. 6, 2017


Problem of the Week (Nov. 6, 2017)
Take a Flight of Fancy



Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.


SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
One of my favorite books of all time is James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl. In one part of the book, 501 seagulls pick up and fly with the giant peach including James and his travelling companions. Is that possible? Or is it just an author’s fanciful imagination? In the spirit of the book, let’s see if any birds could carry even a single child.

Level 1: Soar like an eagle: Harpy eagles can carry small animals that weigh just as much as the eagle itself.  If a harpy eagle weighs 20 pounds, how many eagles would it take to carry a 60 pound child? Hint: Count by 20 until you reach the weight.
Bonus:  How many total wings would that be?

Level 2: Tiny as a Mouse: Sparrows aren’t much bigger than a mouse and they can’t carry more than about 1 ounce. Find out how many sparrows it would take to carry 1 pound (hint: first find out how many ounces are in a pound). Now calculate how many sparrows it would take to lift 2 pounds? How about lift 10 pounds? Bonus: How many sparrows to lift a 60 pound child?

Level 3: That’s a Lot of Feathers:  Related to James and the Giant Peach, some physics students calculated the likely weight of the peach and occupants, then they calculated how much each seagull could weigh. They figured it would require 2,425,907 seagulls. Write this number in words (check your spelling). Bonus: If you subtracted 111,000 seagulls from this total, how many would you have now?

Thank you to Bedtime Math for the problem idea..

Monday, October 30, 2017

The Great Pumpkin Oct. 30, 2017

Problem of the Week (Oct. 30, 2017)
The Great Pumpkin


Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.


SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
The 2nd graders just finished their pumpkin math activity. The pumpkins they used weighed about 10 pounds. Imagine if they used a 1000 pound pumpkin? That is how big pumpkins grown by an Indiana farmer get. He accomplishes this by protecting them from wind, giving them lots of water and nutrients, and only allowing 1 fruit to grow on each vine.


Level 1: Pumpkin Fun: There are 10 pumpkins sitting in a row. If I take one pumpkin to carve into a jack-o-lantern, and I take two pumpkins to make pumpkin pies, then how many pumpkins are left sitting in a row?


Level 2:  Record Setting Pumpkin: The world record for heaviest pumpkin is 2,624 pounds set in Germany in 2016. If the Indiana farmer’s heaviest pumpkin weighs 1,364 pounds, is that more or less than half the weight of the German pumpkin? Hint: If you aren’t sure how to do this problem try using simpler numbers first. For example, if they weigh 25 lbs and 13 lbs, how would you solve the problem? Show how you know using math.  


Level 3: Pumpkin Pie Party:  Pretend you have 7 giant pumpkins. Each pumpkin can make 50 pumpkin pies. How many pumpkin pies can you make with those giant pumpkins? Bonus: If you cut each pie into 4 pieces, how many pieces would you have?


Thank you to Bedtime Math for the problem idea..

Monday, October 23, 2017

Can the Big Bad Wolf Blow It Down? Oct. 23, 2017

Problem of the Week (Oct. 23, 2017)
Can the Big Bad Wolf Blow It Down?

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Everyone knows the story of the Three Little Pigs. They built houses of straw, sticks, and finally bricks. Maybe they should have tried Legos! In 2009, a British TV show used volunteers to build a life sized house out of Legos. It had a working toilet and shower, as well as a bumpy Lego bed.

Level 1: Stripes of Fun: The house was built using only white, red, blue, yellow, and black Legos arranged in layers so the house looked striped. Starting with a white layer on the bottom and going in the order listed above, draw some layers of the house. How many many black layers did you use by the time you reached 15 total layers?

Level 2:  Volunteers: The TV show used volunteers to build the house. Would you want to volunteer? Write one thousand, two hundred using digits instead of words. This was how many volunteers came. Bonus: Write three million, three hundred thousand in digits. This is how many Lego bricks they used.

Level 3: Pick-a-Brick:  The volunteers each worked on building standardized “bricks” using ordinary 8-stud Lego bricks. These house “bricks” were 12 Lego bricks long by 6 Lego bricks wide by 8 Lego bricks high. How many Lego bricks did each standardized house “brick” require?

To learn more about the Lego house, visit :

Thank you to Bedtime Math for the problem ideas and the website link.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Everyone Needs a Friend Oct. 9, 2017

Problem of the Week (Oct. 9, 2017)
Everyone Needs a Friend

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Guinea pigs are very social creatures and they need to have another guinea around to be happy. In Switzerland there is a law that if you own a guinea pig, you must always own at least 2 of them. If people only have one guinea and don’t want to buy another one, they can rent one. These questions are based on some Bedtime Math problems.

Level 1: Itty Bitty Legs: If you must have at least 2 guinea pigs, what is the least number of total legs? (only count the guinea pig legs, not your legs)  Bonus: Guinea pigs have 4 toes on each front foot and 3 toes on each back foot. How many toes does 2 guinea pigs have?

Level 2:  Rent-a-Piggy: If you pay $1 per day to rent a guinea pig for 7 weeks, how much money will you pay?

Level 3: Chow Down:  If there are 80 guinea pigs and each one eats 2 cups of dry food and 1 cup of hay everyday, how much total food do they eat all together in one day?

Super Bonus: Then There Were Some: If ¼ of the 80 guinea pigs are rented out in November, and 3/10 of the remaining guinea pigs are rented out in December, in which month were the most guinea pigs rented out?

Sunday, October 1, 2017

By a Whisker Oct. 2, 2017

Problem of the Week (Oct. 2, 2017)
By a Whisker

Wookie: named for the Chewbacca like sound of his kitten meow

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1: To Fit or Not to Fit: Cat’s look adorable with their whiskers. However, the whiskers are also very important to the cat, because the whiskers tell a cat if an opening is big enough to fit through. If a cat’s whiskers reach 7 inches across and a hole is 8 inches across, will the cat fit? Explain how you know if they fit or don’t fit. Bonus- If a cat has 12 whiskers on each side of its face, how many whiskers does it have? Show work.


Level 2:  Whiskers, Whiskers Everywhere: Besides the whiskers on the sides of their nose, cats also have whiskers on their chin, above their eyes, and behind each front paw. That’s a lot of whiskers! If a cat has nine whiskers on each side of its nose, above each eye, behind each front paw and under its chin, how many whiskers does it have? Draw a picture or make a list to help you.


Level 3: A Clowder of Cats:  A group of cats is sometimes called a clowder (that’s a great vocabulary word for the week). In my clowder of cats, one cat has 80 whiskers, another cat has 36 whiskers, and the 3rd cat’s number of whiskers is halfway in between. How many whiskers does the 3rd cat have? Bonus- How many whiskers altogether in my clowder?

Sunday, September 24, 2017

World's Longest Hot Dogs Sept. 25, 2017


Problem of the Week (Sept. 25, 2017)
World’s Longest Hot Dogs


Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1: Early records: In July 2003, the world record hot dog was 16 feet long. One year later in July 2004, a hot dog broke the record. It was 37 feet long. How much longer was the 2004 hot dog than the 2003 hot dog?



Level 2:  Official Record: The current world record for the longest hot dog and bun is 669 feet, a record set in 2011. A typical hot dog is about 6 inches long (equals ½ foot). How many typical hot dogs can you make from the world record hot dog?



Level 3: Bun Problem:  The world record requires that the hot dog be placed in a continuous bun. That is the hardest part of breaking the record. Usually the dough is placed on a conveyor belt and that takes it into an oven that is open on both ends, The dough cooks as it slowly passes through the oven and comes out on the other side onto another conveyor belt. If it takes 30 minutes to bake each 3 foot section of bun, how long will it take to bake the 669 foot bun from the world record?



For a picture of a 2006 world record hot dog, check out my blog at:     https://problemoftheweekbreck.blogspot.com/