Sunday, September 17, 2017

A Whale of a Slide Sept. 18, 2017

Problem of the Week (Sept. 18, 2017)
A Whale of a Slide


Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.


SHOW ALL YOUR WORK


Read this part before doing any problems:
Near Hawaii, dolphins and humpback whales have been seen interacting in a fun way. The dolphin rides on the whale’s back as the whale surfaces and then the dolphin slides down the whale’s side. They will do that together over and over.


Level 1: Side to Side: If the dolphin first slides down the whale’s left side, then its right side and keeps alternating sides until it has slid down 7 times, how many times did it ride down the right side.


Level 2: Hey, Little Buddy: The 12 foot dolphin is 39 feet shorter than the whale. How long is the whale? Draw a picture or a bar model to help you. Bonus:  If you lined up the dolphin and whale end to end, how long would they be altogether?
Level 3: A Weighty Whale:  The humpback whale weighs 66,000 pounds. If the whale weighs 100 times more than the dolphin, how much does the dolphin weigh?


Thank you to Bedtime Math for the problem ideas this week.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Bee Happy September 11, 2017

Problem of the Week (Sept. 11, 2017)
Bee Happy


Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1: Happy Bees: Six bees went out to find flowers. They found 3 flowers. Draw a picture of the bees on the flowers and try to have the same number of bees on each flower.

Level 2: Honeycomb: Honeycomb is made up of hexagons. How many sides does a hexagon have? Draw a picture with hexagons carefully fitted together like honeycomb. Can you draw one with 12 hexagons?
Level 3: Honey, Honey:  If 1000 bees collect nectar and each bee fills ½ of a honeycomb cell, how many honeycomb cells will be filled?

Welcome back to school!

Monday, April 17, 2017

Flower Shop April 17, 2017

Problem of the Week (April 17, 2017)
Flower Shop



Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK on a separate sheet of paper.
PLEASE BE NEAT AND ORGANIZED.

READ FIRST: This week the problem is one big word problem divided into 3 levels. In order to complete Level 2, you must complete Level 1 first. In order to complete Level 3, you must complete Level 2 first.  

Level 1:  Grand Opening:
Rose, Tulip, and Daffodil decided to start a flower shop. On the day of their grand opening, they sold 45 roses. They also sold 5 fewer daffodils than they sold of the roses. They sold 12 more tulips than they sold of the daffodils. Draw a picture or bar model to help you. How many of each type of flower did they sell?
Roses = ________________
Daffodils = ________________
Tulips = ________________

Level 2:  Success or Failure?:  
How many total flowers did they sell the first day? Show your calculations. Their goal was to sell 100 flowers each day? Did they make their goal for their first day? Explain how much over or under the goal they were.

Level 3: Weekly Average:

The rest of the week was very busy for the 3 women. On Tuesday, they sold 84 flowers. On Wednesday, they sold 102 flowers. On Thursday, they sold 95, and finally on Friday, they sold 112 flowers. Find the average number of flowers they sold each day (don’t forget to include Monday). Average can be found by adding up all the numbers and then dividing by the number of days. Was their average better or worse than their $100/day goal?

Puzzler's Request April 10, 2017

Problem of the Week (April 10, 2017)
Puzzler’s Request

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK on a separate sheet of paper.
PLEASE BE NEAT AND ORGANIZED.

I have received a request for more riddle and logic type problems. So here you go….

Level 1:  Riddle Me This:
Follow the steps below in order to get the answer. Remember that sum means addition, difference means subtraction, product means multiplication, and quotient means division. All steps will involve positive, whole numbers.
  1. Start with the number of days we are in school this week.
  2. Add the Ms. Simonson’s birthday (hint: it is the last day of June).
  3. Divide by the number of legs on the 1st bird of spring!
  4. Subtract the number of toes on 1 foot of a typical 1st grader.
  5. Multiply by the number of 3rd grade teachers at Breck this year.
Show your work and circle the answer!

Level 2:  Jumping Frogs:  (thank you to Mindware Perplexors)
Five kids (named Joe, John, Julie, Joy, and Jimmy) entered a total of five frogs in a frog-jumping contest: Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, and Bumpy. In some order the frogs jumped 30 feet, 25 feet, 20 feet, 15 feet, and 3 feet. Use the clues below to match the kid with their frog, and the distance each frog jumped. Think about how you can organize the options and eliminate combinations bit by bit.
  1. Jimmy’s frog Bumpy only jumped half as far as Jumpy, but 5 times as much as Julie’s frog.
  2. Floppy jumped 20 feet.
  3. Joe and John had frogs that jumped more than 20 feet.
  4. Hoppy jumped the shortest distance.
  5. Joe’s frog jumped 25 feet.
Use this list as one possible way to organize:
Joe     (Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, Bumpy)  (30 ft., 25 ft., 20 ft., 15 ft., 3 ft.)
John   (Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, Bumpy)  (30 ft., 25 ft., 20 ft., 15 ft., 3 ft.)
Julie    (Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, Bumpy)  (30 ft., 25 ft., 20 ft., 15 ft., 3 ft.)
Joy      (Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, Bumpy)  (30 ft., 25 ft., 20 ft., 15 ft., 3 ft.)
Jimmy (Hoppy, Floppy, Choppy, Jumpy, Bumpy)  (30 ft., 25 ft., 20 ft., 15 ft., 3 ft.)

Level 3: April Code Breaker:
Each unique letter represents a number. The number-letter relationship is the same for each problem.

A + B + C = 15
A + B + B = 8

C + C + B + B + A = 24

Answer: A = _________   B = __________   C = ___________

Sunday, April 2, 2017

April Fool's Day April 3, 2017

Problem of the Week (April 3, 2017)
April Fool’s Day

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK on a separate sheet of paper.
PLEASE BE NEAT AND ORGANIZED.


Did you play any April Fool’s Day pranks or jokes on anyone? Below are some math problems related to some possible jokes, and a chance to share your own.


Level 1:  Cereal in the Cold
If you freeze a bowl of cereal and milk, it takes about 4 hours of thaw time before it is soft enough to eat. If you start thawing at 9:00am, what time will the cereal be ready to eat?  Bonus, if you want to eat the cereal at 7:30am, what time would you have to start thawing it?
Level 2:  A Tank of Fun:  
Empty the clothes out of a drawer. Line it with plastic, fill it with water and fish to make an aquarium. Do you think this would surprise someone if you did it to them? Let’s say you put in 14 goldfish, and 6 tetras. What fraction of the fish are tetras?
Bonus: Now add 12 more fish of varying kinds. If ⅛ of all the fish are tangs, how many fish are tangs?


Level 3: Create a problem:
Make up a math problem about a joke you played, or about a joke you might play some day.





Credit: Bedtime Math for the prank ideas.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Number Soup Mar. 6, 2017


Problem of the Week (Mar. 6, 2017)
Number Soup
Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK on a separate sheet of paper.
PLEASE BE NEAT AND ORGANIZED.

Use these digits when solving this week’s problems.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Level 1:  High and Low:
  1. Find the highest total when adding 4 different digits listed above.
_____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = __________ Now describe a mental math strategy to add the digits.

    B. Find the lowest total when adding 4 different digits listed above.
_____ + _____ + _____ + _____ = __________
Level 2:  Back and Forth:  Use your answers from the Level 1 question. Can you figure out a way to arrange the 8 digits you used in Level 1 to make an addition problem that adds up to 11,110? Show your different attempts (don’t erase).
_____  _____  _____  _____
+ _____  _____  _____  _____
_______________________________
                 1    1  ,   1     1      0

Level 3: Create a Puzzle: Now it is your turn to create a puzzle for me using the same 9 digits on the top of this page. Write the math puzzle with clear instructions on a separate sheet of paper.


Sunday, February 26, 2017

Alphabet Soup Feb. 27, 2017


Problem of the Week (Feb. 27, 2017)
Alphabet Soup

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK on a separate sheet of paper.
PLEASE BE NEAT AND ORGANIZED.


Level 1:  Take Flight: This puzzle is one that Mrs. Bailey found in a airplane flight magazine. She thought you might enjoy it. Directions: In the subtraction problem below, each letter stands for one digit from 0-9. Each letter is a different number. Find the value of A, B, and C.
A B A                     A=? B=? C=?
-   C A
                                                                              A B
Level 2:  Code Breakers:  This puzzle is adapted from puzzles found in a book titled Code Breakers published by Mindware. Solve the puzzle by determining what number belongs in place of each letter. All the numbers are whole numbers, positive numbers, and they can’t be zero. The numbers can be one digit (ex. 8) or more than one digit (ex. 13). In the puzzle, the letter A must always be the same number throughout the puzzle, and the same goes for B and C.
A=?  B=?  C=?
B + C = 13
C + C = 12
A + B = 10
Level 3: Advanced Code Breaker: Read the instructions above for Level 2, except instead of A, B, and C you will be have D, E, and F. Now try to solve this puzzle.
D=? E=? F=?
D + E + F = 14
F + E + E + F = 22
D + E + F + D + E = 21