Sunday, May 6, 2018

Lemonade Stand (May 7, 2018)

Problem of the Week (May 7, 2018)
Lemonade Stand

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK (show your calculations even if you did them in your head).
Have you ever run a lemonade stand? It is a great way to start learning about running a business and you get to use real life MATH! Here is a recipe to make 1 batch of lemonade.
1 Cup Lemon juice (use 5-6 lemons)
¾ Cup Sugar
1 Cup Ice
4 Cups Water
The recipe makes 48 ounces (eight servings 6 oz. each).

Level 1: Ingredients: Every business needs to think carefully about how much their supplies cost. To make 48 ounces of lemonade you need 1 cup of lemon juice. You can squeeze 5 fresh lemons to get 1 cup or get it from a bottle of juice. (Note: 8 ounces - 1 cup). Circle the source you want for your lemon juice and explain why you chose that.

1 lemon costs $1 (hint: how many lemons to make 1 cup)    16 ounces lemon juice costs $2

I chose _____________________________ because ___________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Level 2: Sugary Sweet:  Now let’s figure out how many batches of lemonade can be made from a 4 pound bag of sugar. One pound equals 16 ounces. How many ounces in 4 pounds of sugar?   ____________________ (Hint: should you multiply or divide). Each batch of lemonade uses 7 ounces of sugar. How many batches can you make from 4 pounds of sugar?  ________________________ (Hint: should you multiply or divide).

Level 3: Mix It Up: Let’s make some lemonade! Below is a chart of the ingredients to use and how about how much it costs to make 1 batch. Decide how many batches of lemonade you will make and calculate the total cost of your supplies.


Ingredient
Cost per batch
Number of batches
Your cost
Lemon juice (1 C.)
$1.00


Sugar (7 oz.)
$0.33


8 Cups (hold 6 oz. each)
$0.30


TOTAL Cost





Final question:  Each batch will make 8 servings. How much will you charge people to buy 1 glass of your lemonade and why?  __________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

Take a Chance Day (April 23, 2018)

Problem of the Week (April 23, 2018)
Take a Chance Day
Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did.  So throw off the bowline, sail away from the safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream.  Discover.”  ~ Mark Twain

April 23rd is National Take a Chance Day so break out of your comfort zone and try something new. To help you get in the mood, there are some challenging problems down below..

Level 1: Worm Madness: The 1st graders are raising worms for composting food scraps. They started with just a handful but the worms are having babies. Let’s do a little worm math. Start with 2 worms and every week the number of worms will double. Make a chart to show how many worms you will have after 6 weeks.  Can you show even more weeks? How high do you want to go?

Level 2: Math Contest:  Some Breck LS students decided to take a chance and entered a math contest this spring. They are still waiting for their results, but they had fun. Here is a sample question from the 3rd grade contest...give it a try:  
Joshua’s age is a two-digit number and Luke’s age is a one-digit number. If you subtract Luke’s age from Joshua’s age, you will get 1. What number will you get if you add the two boys’ ages together?

Level 3: Design Challenge: Here is your chance to take a chance. Design a problem that I can use for the Problem of the Week. Before you turn it in, test your problem on someone to get ideas on how to make it better. Don’t forget to provide an answer key for your problem.

Snow Show (April 16, 2018)

Problem of the Week (April 16, 2018)
Snow Show
Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1: Deep: How much snow has fallen in Minneapolis this winter? Here are the number of inches for each month: April = 26 inches, March = 9 inches, February = 16 inches, January = 20 inches, and December = 6 inches. How many total inches is that?

Level 2: Long Winter:  Winter has been unusually long this year and hopefully you are having fun playing in the snow. Officially in Minnesota, the first day this winter we had measurable snow on the ground was December 5, 2017. Today is April 16, 2018. How many days of snow on the ground have we had?

Level 3: What’s in an Inch: Can you add decimals? Give it a try. I have listed the total snowfall in inches for everyday in April 2018 that we received snow.
April 2 = 1.5 inches
April 3 = 7.5
April 8 = 1.2
April 9 = 0.1
April 13 = 1.1
April 14 = 11.1
April 15 = 3.5

What is the total snowfall for April?    _____________________

Bird Lovers (April 9, 2018)


Problem of the Week (April 9, 2018)
Bird Lovers

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
We love birds at Breck School. How many of you have been following the Eagle Cam in the  3-4 Commons? In honor of the eagles, this week is all about birds.

Level 1: Circling around:  One challenge for artists is drawing animals using only circles. See link at the bottom of the page for more info on this technique. But for this activity you can draw a bird using 3 circles, 2 triangles, and 8 straight lines. Try using only the shapes I listed.
Bonus:  Draw a bird using any combination of circles, triangles, and straight lines you want. Then make a list showing how many of each you used.

Level 2: What’s in a Name: Everyone has heard of a flock of birds, but did you know that different types of birds have different names for their flocks. Add up the total number of birds listed alongside their group name: a raft of eighty ducks, a gaggle of seventeen geese, a bouquet of six hummingbirds, and a squadron of twelve pelicans.

Level 3: That’s a Stretch: A full size ostrich is 7 feet tall. In order to draw the full height of an ostrich on paper, you will need to tape a lot of 11 inch long pieces of paper end to end. If you overlap each sheet of paper 1 inch on each end, how many sheets of paper will you need?
Bonus: And if you used the same method to make it 5 feet wide, how many total sheets of paper would you need?



Monday, March 12, 2018

Knights of the Bar Models (March 12, 2018)

Problem of the Week (March 12, 2018)
The Knights of the Bar Models

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Winter is almost over, spring break starts soon. So let’s leave winter behind with some challenging word problems. And for those that want more great problems, check out Noetic Learning  

Level 1: Sir Rope-a-lot:  Sir Rope-a-lot has a 36 foot long rope. He wants to cut it into 2 pieces but they do not have to be the same length. However, no piece of rope can be less than 4 feet long. Make a chart or table to show Sir Rope-a-lot all the different ways he could cut the rope into 2 pieces (example: he can cut the rope into a 4 foot piece and a 32 foot piece because 4 + 32 = 36).

Level 2: Sir Rope-s’more: Sir Rope-a-lot’s friend is named Sir Rope-s’more. He has a rope that is 28 feet long. He wants to cut the rope into 2 pieces, but he wants the longer piece to be 4 feet longer than the shorter piece. Draw a bar model or make a chart to figure out the answer to both questions below.
How long is the longer piece of rope?
How long is the shorter piece of rope?

Level 3: Sir No-rope: Sir No-rope doesn’t have any rope, but he does have 3 friends named Rina, Maria, and Addie. He is trying to figure out the age of each friend. He knows their total age is 54 years. He knows that Rina is 3 times older than Maria. He also knows that Addie is twice as old as Maria. Draw a bar model that compares the 3 people and use it to answer the question. How old is Maria?
Bonus: How old is Rina?   How old is Addie?

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Please read: Ms. Simonson is thinking about some Breck students participating in a math contest this spring or fall. It will be just for fun. If you are interested, please put your full name and class on this line:  _________________________________________________________

Cookies and Dentists (March 6, 2018)

Problem of the Week (March 6, 2018)
Cookies and Dentists

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK
Does anyone else find it strange that March 6th is both National Oreo Cookie Day and National Dentist’s Day? I guess if you are going to celebrate Oreos by eating them, you should also make sure you get your teeth looked after to prevent cavities from all that sugar.

Level 1: Oreo Math:  Everyone knows Oreos for their creamy center, but did you know there is a mathematical relationship between the amount of cookie and the amount of creamy center?  If one Oreo is considered to be 100% and the cookie portion is 71% of that, what percent of the Oreo is the creamy center?

Bonus: Hydrox cookies look just like Oreos and some people think they are copycats. However, Hydrox were created in 1908, while Oreos came 4 years later. What year were Oreos created?  (use this info in Level 3)

Level 2: Teeth: By the time you are an adult, you will have the following list of teeth:
8 incisors, 4 canines, 8 premolars, 12 molars.
Part A: How many total teeth will you have?  Part B: How many more premolars and molars will you have than canines? Part C: How many more teeth do you need to get to the total teeth of an adult?
Tooth trivia: Ancient Egyptians brushed their teeth using a tooth powder made from crushed egg shells and oxen hooves.

Level 3: Cookie Division: Since their introduction in the year _______ (fill in the blank by using the answer to level 1 bonus), at least 450 billion Oreo cookies have been sold. How many cookies (on average) was that per year through this year 2018? This question is a whopper! Good luck.

NAME: ________________________ TEACHER: ___________

Love Your Pet (Feb. 20, 2018)

Problem of the Week (Feb. 20, 2018)
Love Your Pet
Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.
SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1: Doggie Run: There are plenty of dogs at the Westminster Kennel Club Show, all sizes and colors. If you have 5 dogs in the show ring, how many dog legs are there?
Bonus: If each dog has a human handler, how many total legs are in the show ring?

Level 2: Dogs vs. Cats: Ever wonder which pet is more popular, dogs or cats? Here are some numbers to help you figure it out. Part A: There are 43,346,000 households in the United States that have dogs. There are 36,117,000 households that have cats. Are there more households with cats or with dogs? ___________________
Part B: There are 69,926,000 pet dogs in the United States, and 74,059,000 pet cats. Are there more dogs or more cats? _____________________
Bonus: Which pet do you think is more popular and why?

Level 3: Big Number Party: Use the information in the Level 2 question to answer these questions.

  1. How many total dogs and cats are household pets in the United States?
  2. How many more cats are there than dogs?



NAME: _________________________ TEACHER: ___________