Monday, December 12, 2016

Robots Nov. 29, 2016


Problem of the Week (Nov. 29, 2016)
Robots

Directions: Write your work on a separate sheet of paper. Label the paper with your FULL name, your teacher, and which problem(s) you are handing in, then staple it to this sheet.

SHOW ALL YOUR WORK

Level 1 Legos:  On December 4th, some Middle School students will be competing in a Lego Robotics competition. Their robots are built using basic Lego bricks. A 2x4 Lego brick has the dimensions listed below (you can choose whether you use inches or centimeters):

Inches
Centimeters
Length
1  1/4
32
Width
5/8
16

If you want to build a rectangular platform that is 5 bricks long and 5 bricks wide, what will be the overall dimensions (length and width of the platform? Bonus:  Build an example platform, take a picture, and print the picture and staple it on here.

Level 2 Directions: Robots need instructions in the correct order to be able to move around. Below is a maze for a robot to go through. Can you write the instructions the robot needs to go through the maze starting at the green square (at top) and ending at the red square (at bottom)? Remember left and right are based on the direction the robot is facing, and it can only move forward (not sideways). You can only use the following 3 commands:
Forward 1 square, Turn right 90 degrees, Turn left 90 degrees
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Level 3  Binary Communication:  You normally count in base 10: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. When you go up one from 9, you need to start a new place value: 10 and you start the ones place value counting up again: 11, 12, 13, etc.. You do it everyday and don’t even think about it. However, computers don’t use base 10, they use base 2. So here is what that looks like: 0, 1, 10, 11, 100, 101, 110, 111. Do you see the pattern? Use the chart below to fill in the next base 2 numbers.


Base 10 number
Base 2 equivalent
1
1
2
10
3
11
4
100
5
101
6
110
7
111
8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16





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